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The most commonly used Fluorescence Filter Sets in Microcopy

The most commonly used Fluorescence Filter Sets in Microcopy

At Munday Scientific and Microscope Marketplace we have a strong relationship with the American based company Chroma  They have unmatched quality and produce the top fluorescence filters in the world.  Their product is excellent and their service/support is top notch.  

We thought it would be fun to ask Chat GPT the "what is the most commonly used fluorescence filters in microscopy"  This is the answer received 

The most common fluorescence filter sets used on microscopes typically correspond to the widely used fluorescent dyes and proteins. These filter sets are optimized to provide the best excitation and emission profiles for specific fluorophores. However, please keep in mind that the popularity of specific filter sets can vary depending on the field of research and the specific requirements of the imaging setup. Here are some of the most common fluorescence filter sets:

  1. DAPI: Excitation around 360-390 nm and emission around 420-470 nm.

  2. FITC/GFP: Excitation around 450-490 nm and emission around 500-550 nm.

  3. TRITC/Cy3: Excitation around 530-580 nm and emission around 590-650 nm.

  4. Cy5: Excitation around 620-650 nm and emission around 660-720 nm.

  5. Alexa Fluor 488: Excitation around 450-490 nm and emission around 500-550 nm.

  6. Alexa Fluor 555/568: Excitation around 530-580 nm and emission around 590-650 nm.

  7. Alexa Fluor 647: Excitation around 620-650 nm and emission around 660-720 nm.

  8. mCherry: Excitation around 530-580 nm and emission around 590-650 nm.

  9. Cyanine 3 (Cy3): Excitation around 530-580 nm and emission around 590-650 nm.

  10. Cyanine 5 (Cy5): Excitation around 620-650 nm and emission around 660-720 nm.

It's important to note that many microscopes and imaging systems allow for flexibility in filter configuration. Some advanced systems might even have tunable filters or filter cubes that can accommodate multiple excitation and emission wavelengths simultaneously.

For the most accurate and up-to-date information on common fluorescence filter sets, I recommend checking with microscope manufacturers, consulting specialized microscopy resources, or reaching out to experts in your specific research field. As technology and research needs evolve, new fluorophores and filter sets may emerge, leading to changes in the most commonly used configurations.

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